FAQ

A mix of questions about clean processes and questions about the services we offer. If you have a question that's not listed here, please contact us. We're happy to help.


Topics

General

Coaching

Payments


What is Systemic Modelling?

Systemic Modelling is all about getting a diverse group working at their best to achieve shared tasks - whether that's building a new product, co-creating a learning space, streamlining procurement or creating safe, happy communities. Using a mix of Clean Language and clean-nish questions, a handful of metaphors, and some easy-to-learn models, the group members develop a rough guide to themselves and one another. They can then use these guides to make the smallest adjustments necessary to work effectively and efficiently together, creating a shared sense of safety, belonging and freedom. 

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What is Clean Language?

Clean Language Questions, developed by counselling psychologist, David Grove, are a simple set of questions designed to accept and extend what someone is saying without unduly influencing the content of what they say. They were originally developed for counsellors to be able to work with a client's experience without bringing the therapist's logic, mental structures or assumptions into the session. By working directly with the content of the client Grove discovered that symptoms held the seeds of a client's healing and that by doing less and supporting the client to self-generate a metaphor landscape for their symptom, the client's system could create its own insights, transformations and learning.

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What is Emergent Knowledge?

Emergent Knowledge is one of the last processes developed by David Grove before his untimely death in 2008. It is a process of self-discovery which involves the iterative use of clean language questions. It allows the facilitator to keep themselves out of the client's content and uses an algorithm of asking the same question six times as a way of iteratively allowing new information to emerge.

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What is the Whirly Gig?

David Grove was investigating where attention goes during and after traumatic events and he started to find different ways that clients could re-access and reintegrate parts of themselves that had fragmented. He experimented with electric wheelchairs, spinning chairs, acrobatic hoists and other ways of asking a client to attend to their proprioception and answer the question: what do you know from this direction here? But what he really wanted was something that allowed them to choose their direction, to have 360 degrees of freedom. Together with Shaun Hotchkiss, he played around until he had the machine just the way he wanted it. Then it was all about finding out what happened next to clients when using this unique instrument.

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Who was David Grove?

David Grove was the creative genius who developed Clean Language therapy and many innovative ways to support individual systems to heal from trauma. Alongside Clean Language, he developed Clean Space, Emergent Knowledge, The Power of Six, Clean Hieroglyphics and the use of the Whirly Gig for working with embodied trauma that didn't respond to talking therapy. His work is the source for Symbolic and Systemic Modelling and Clean Language interviewing.

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What is Clean Feedback?

Clean Feedback is a simple, effective way of giving better quality feedback to yourself and to others. It can be used as a personal development tool or as a way of creating a psychologically safer culture across families, teams, and organisations. At its core is the ability to separate our responses into three categories: Evidence, Inference, and Impact. It should be used in conjunction with an understanding of the Drama Triangle to ensure you are not weaponizing the Clean Feedback model to confirm your own bias.

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What does the ‘clean’ in Clean Language stand for?

The clean of Clean Language is an intention by the questioner to keep their own bias, assumptions or expectations to a minimum and to leave the person receiving the question with as much freedom as possible to answer in a way that suits their own system. They were developed by the Counselling Psychologist David Grove and applied initially to support clients in resolving traumatic memories.

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How many clean coaching sessions will I need?

Some people just need one, some people need three and some people will have a few on a specific topic and spend months, even years, integrating their learning until they are ready to come back for more. We recommend that you book one coaching session and see whether it serves your purpose and whether Clean Language coaching suits your system or way of learning. From here, your Clean Language Coach can work with you to decide on the kind of coaching and the frequency.

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How soon can I start my coaching?

Make an enquiry via email to caitlin@trainingattention.co.uk or fill in a contact form and we will get back to you for an initial 15 minute call to inquire into your outcomes and recommend a suitable coach for your needs. Following the initial inquiry call, we will send you some preparation questions so you can begin developing your answers straight away. Some of our coaches have very busy diaries so there may be a week or two before we can fit you in but we will take your personal situation into consideration. 

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Can I pay by instalments?

Yes, you can pay by monthly instalments. Please email Emily Edwards via our contact form to arrange this with her. 

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Can I pay by BACs?

Yes. If you'd like to do this, we will send you an invoice for the event you'd like to book which will have our account details on it. Please email Emily Edwards via our contact form providing your name, address, phone number and the event you would like to book. 

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